typette:

nadiaoxford:

evilsoutherngentleman:

megan-is-a-doll:

dorkly:

"Eye of the Tiger" Played on an Old Dot-Matrix Printer

"Papa, what did the ’80s sound like?"

I just laughed so hard I almost puked.

I am so glad I know you, and that people make things like this.

This is humanity’s most important achievement. 

someone make a fucking hardcore techno remix of this shit with a sick bass line and synths, DO IT

35,809 notes

waltztothemoon:

minuiko:

pchoop:

Last night’s wild lesbian bird shoujos for bloo



(via jessdean)

13,307 notes

rebekkadraws:

(via wecansexy)

5,838 notes

lesueurpeas:

i cant stop thinking about ancient egyptian zelda ugh
tbh i dont know a lot about loz though so you guys can consider this whatever (i will use any excuse to draw non eurocentric princesses/queens)

(via typette)

8,102 notes

starryeyedqueen:

itsstuckyinmyhead:

History told by Tumblr 

I needed this during AP world history thanks a lot tumblr never here when I need you the most

(via jessdean)

47,828 notes

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

(via feelknower1993)

21,469 notes

medievalpoc:

kyraneko:

medievalpoc:

frank-e-shadow-tongue:

supernatasha:

part-ofthecult:

Hogwarts Founders
» Idris Elba // Lucy Liu // Hrithik Roshan // Angel Coulby

While I do love that whoever made this did a good job matching actors to characters, the one issue I have is that Hogwarts is in England and what founded several centuries ago. I’m not saying that there wouldn’t have been blacks or asians in England at the time, but it’s still a historical inaccuracy to depict them as anything other than white Englishmen, since the culture of England at the time wouldn’t have had room for blacks and asians as anything other than slaves or traders.

Please don’t take this as me being racist, this is just me with a debilitating and incurable need for historical accuracy.

So let’s see. The Sorting claims it’s origins about a thousand or so years ago in it’s song, which implies the 1000s. JK Rowling described them as “medieval," which is about 500 to 1500, again agreeing with our 1000 date. So let’s work with that. We’ve got a pretty decent timeline to work with here. 

There have been black people in Scotland since “classical times,” and black moors present in James IV’s royal court in the 1500s, plus there’s St. Deiniol in Wales in the 500s, implying black people were also in the religious court instead of all just slaves and servants. Therefore, could a strong and fearless future-Gryffindor have ancestry native to the Isles? Hmmm.

Hannibal of Carthage was definitely not white (at least not in the modern sense). As a matter of fact, many Mediterranean descended people are mixed with Central Asians, South Asians, and North Africans so… But anyway, in 1555, black men were learning to be interpreters in London to help with trading in the Ghanian region. Here’s a coat of arms with black people on it dated 1616. Also, literally how do you not know about Dido Elizabeth Belle, an aristocratic lady of Scotland from the 1700s???

The Romani migrated out what is now modern day India and Pakistan in about the 1000s, so add in that they’re wizards who can fly and all that jazz, they could’ve easily gotten there within a year or two and settled in Scotland once they learned white people weren’t treating them very kindly. There you go, that’s how a South Asian Slytherin made it to Scotland just in time to found Hogwarts.

Here’s desi people of color from the Indian subcontinent, called Lascars, who had been sailing in Europe from as early as the 1400s, possibly earlier, still fitting that there could’ve been wizards in the British Isles about a hundred or so years earlier. Art from the 1600s showing brown men in turbans. Here’s an Indian man who in the 1700s ran a successful restaurant in England and taught white people to shampoo their hair lol.

Japanese emissaries came to Europe as early as 1584 and observed there were already Chinese and Japanese slaves among the overwhelmingly black slaves, something blamed on Christianity, which was part of the reason why Japan vehemently became isolated from that point.

Also about East Asia, Mongolian Genghis Khan made it to about Poland-ish in the 1200s, so it’s not a far bet to say the Chinese (who were also conquered by Khan on his way to Europe) could’ve found their way to Scotland around that time or a few hundred years earlier. Along with a smart cookie who would go on to be the founder of Ravenclaw.

Native Americans, of course, have been present in Europe for a while. In the 1500s, Manteo and Wanchese arrived in London. There’s evidence the Vikings and Indigenous Americans were friendly long before when Columbus blah blah, and there’s even evidence of Native Americans in Holland that’s like 2000 years old. Could a kind and loyal future Hufflepuff be one of those mixed race indigenous American-Africans?

ALSO considering the fact that Binns (the history professor at Hogwarts) specifically stated that witches and wizards were being persecuted and Hogwarts was built out of sight of Muggle eyes, it’s completely possible that POC came to Scotland and built the castle happily for other magical humans to have a safe place. Since HP universe is a fantasy anyway, read these article while you’re at it.

So yeah, I understand your implication that you don’t want to be racist or anything like that (bc being called racist is ofc so much worse than actually being ignorant), but POC were not just traders and slaves in the British Isles, they were a fuckton of other things your history books aren’t telling you (or trying to intentionally steer you away from). So me having an all-brown cast for a location in a dominantly-white place I’m sure is irking the fuck out of you, and that makes me so glad to see you confronted with that “incurable” need for historical accuracy you have.

And check out this rad blog: Racebending Harry Potter.

how come the only time people mention the enslavement of black people in Europe is when they want to deny our presence in fantasy fiction?

And that’s what it really boils down to pretty much every time.

Because someone couldn’t deal with a single photoset with characters of color in a FANTASY setting. None of the “fact checking” is really necessary, because that isn’t really the issue. Fantasy fiction isn’t something that should be subject to “proof”, but when it comes to racial diversity, it invariably is every time.

It’s my hope that with Medievalpoc, this endless quibbling about what is and is not “historically accurate” can be done away with, and Toni Morrison’s quote here can become creative people of color’s realities:

image

I love how the OP is “not racist, just suffering from a need for historical accuracy” and yet feels the need to piss on somebody’s fantasy fancasting, not about the plausibility of wizards who almost certainly didn’t exist but about the plausibility of people of color who not only did exist but demonstrably did exist there.

Telling people that they can’t have fiction about people like them because you need “historical accuracy” in their fantasy is, at best, selfish as fuck; treating people of color like anything they produce is yours first and foremost, not theirs, is well into racism territory, both in what it does to them and that you feel you can and should do it.

Also, citing a need for historical accuracy to support a very simplistic, naive, utterly unresearched position that boils down to “my assumptions make sense to me so nothing else could ever be right” plus “it can’t have been different from what I think because nobody ever told me” is self-servicing bullshit. Historical accuracy means you look at what IS rather than just assuming what you want to see. Granted, history is historically shitty at this. OP is nothing new. But OP is also applying more stringent standards to someone else’s fiction than to hir own understanding of history. And that’s no good.

That’s a pretty good summation. And that’s the thing-none of this is really about history at all.

(via ursulavernon)

45,942 notes

typette:

yondamoegi:

dreamsofjade:

hoganddice:

captkylej:

themaskednegro:

bowiesnippleantennae:

whatarefrogs:

JonTron just linked this image as an example of how men are stereotyped and exploited in video games I’m literally laughing out loud holy shit

for anyone who still doesn’t get it notice the background please

Fun fact: topless slave girls are COLLECTIBLES in this game.

See, the problem is that the guys objectification is empowering. You’re empowered because you’re taking advantage of the other objectified people.

Also, can my followers who like guys please comment on whether or not they find this guy sexually attractive?

nah, too much muscle. Muscle is hard… I want something soft to rest my head on! :P the only guy that i’ve ever been attracted to who has looked like this is Jason Momoa. 

I personally like muscles. I adore them. They fascinate me.
But this Conan doesn’t look sexually attractive. He looks like he’s gonna kill me - he’s intimidating and forceful. I’d better stay away from him.
If he looked like this
I’d say “Well, hello sexy.”
Objectification and sexualization don’t really depend on character’s looks, even if they use it to objectificate and sexualize. They depend on character’s purpose and agency.
A girl character can run around with her titties exposed but still could be not sexualized.

Just my 2 cents

If like, Conan was a bit of a dorky outcast amongst a village of a ton of hypermasculine men and objectified women, who set off to prove his worth having been raised in this mindset and instead wound up saving the world with badass female warrior who kicks a ton of ass but is also a really sweet and complex character as well, and the entire thing is just a huge tongue-in-cheek critique of the misrepresentation of gender in western society and how “manliness” has inherently nothing to do with how big your muscles are or how many bitches you fuck, and femininity isn’t about having tig ol bitties and being a collectors item- they are the respect you give to others and the courage to be yourself in the face of all this bullshit where every character conquers their ill relationship to these harmful stereotypes by the end 
oh wait that already exists as a movie

Ronal the Barbarian, it’s sooo R-rated like only european animation can be but it’s hilariously awesome, go find the subtitled danish version that isn’t butchered in English and see what I mean
the best part is that it’s advertising campaign/trailers were basically jabs at how shitty movies that they’re riffing on are advertised, too, with boobs and explosions, it’s amazing
….I should stream it. hmm

typette:

yondamoegi:

dreamsofjade:

hoganddice:

captkylej:

themaskednegro:

bowiesnippleantennae:

whatarefrogs:

JonTron just linked this image as an example of how men are stereotyped and exploited in video games I’m literally laughing out loud holy shit

for anyone who still doesn’t get it notice the background please

Fun fact: topless slave girls are COLLECTIBLES in this game.

See, the problem is that the guys objectification is empowering. You’re empowered because you’re taking advantage of the other objectified people.

Also, can my followers who like guys please comment on whether or not they find this guy sexually attractive?

nah, too much muscle. Muscle is hard… I want something soft to rest my head on! :P the only guy that i’ve ever been attracted to who has looked like this is Jason Momoa. 

I personally like muscles. I adore them. They fascinate me.

But this Conan doesn’t look sexually attractive. He looks like he’s gonna kill me - he’s intimidating and forceful. I’d better stay away from him.

If he looked like this

I’d say “Well, hello sexy.”

Objectification and sexualization don’t really depend on character’s looks, even if they use it to objectificate and sexualize. They depend on character’s purpose and agency.

A girl character can run around with her titties exposed but still could be not sexualized.

Just my 2 cents

If like, Conan was a bit of a dorky outcast amongst a village of a ton of hypermasculine men and objectified women, who set off to prove his worth having been raised in this mindset and instead wound up saving the world with badass female warrior who kicks a ton of ass but is also a really sweet and complex character as well, and the entire thing is just a huge tongue-in-cheek critique of the misrepresentation of gender in western society and how “manliness” has inherently nothing to do with how big your muscles are or how many bitches you fuck, and femininity isn’t about having tig ol bitties and being a collectors item- they are the respect you give to others and the courage to be yourself in the face of all this bullshit where every character conquers their ill relationship to these harmful stereotypes by the end 

oh wait that already exists as a movie

Ronal the Barbarian, it’s sooo R-rated like only european animation can be but it’s hilariously awesome, go find the subtitled danish version that isn’t butchered in English and see what I mean

the best part is that it’s advertising campaign/trailers were basically jabs at how shitty movies that they’re riffing on are advertised, too, with boobs and explosions, it’s amazing

….I should stream it. hmm

(Source: whatareghouls)

23,865 notes

"

Someone in a thread over at the Pathfinder RPG pafe said said “These personal issues really distracts from the game. Does anyone remember the days when none of this stuff was a friggin issue and all we had was fun????”

Such a time never existed, and if you think it does it’s because either as a guy you never had to deal with it, or for some reason your experiences were sheltered.

You know what days *I* remember?

I remember being told no matter how well I rolled, my female D&D fighter could not, as a matter of the *rules* be as strong as a man. Another player could decide his 13-year-old boy PC had a 18/00 Strength because he was magically blessed, but as a female character I *couldn’t*.

I remember bringing in a new character and being told they’d pick me up at the next village, and my background would be randomly rolled for. And do you know what was rolled? Harlot. And then I had to see what KIND of harlot. But, I was assured, this was totally fair. Because I might end up being a pimp, which would mean I was a male character.

But no, I was a wanton wench.

I remember not being ABLE to find a figure for a female warrior who didn’t have her tits, ass, thighs, or all of the above exposed. I remember being shown an editorial in Dragon Magazine where Kim Mohan *admitted* that sexualization in female miniatures was a problem, but claimed the Strength cap wasn’t “something any reasonable person could argue with” … AND didn’t offer any suggestions on how to deal with either issue.

I remember being told that since my magic-user’s level title for the next level was “sorcerer,” and not “sorceress,” and there was NO evidence in the rules of female sorcerers, I could NOT gain that level.

These were the people who TAUGHT me to role-play. And yeah that last argument is stupid, but I had NO WAY of knowing that. I mean there were racial caps for classes, and a Strength cap for gender, so why wouldn’t I accept a gender cap for classes?

Those days sucked. Roleplaying was so great a thrill I wanted to do it anyway. It wasn’t until one of the toads I played with physically assaulted me I left that group, because I was young and impressionable and they had LOTS of evidence that was just How the Game Was Played.

Never, EVER think that HOW a company describes things, presents itself, covers issue of gender and sexual orientation in the rules, and comports itself with customers doesn’t have a MAJOR impact on the culture of people playing the game.

TSR, and then WotC, had a LONG history of showing that women are second-class PCs at best, and mostly exist as sex objects to cling to the thighs of Conan-like heroes. Played by Boys. Gary Gygaz once said that women’s Brains are “Wired Differently,” and that’s why they just aren’t interested in rpgs. Of course that attitude impacted how woman were portrayed, and thus how a lot of players and DMs played.

It’s NOT that “All Cheesecake is Bad.” I’m not claiming you can’t have sexy character and nods to pulp – you just have to have them for both genders, and you have to have more than that. You have to show a RANGE of characters, male and female, spellcaster and warrior, preferable in every product but absolutely in the core rules.

Paizo and Pathfinder do a MUCH better job of that than anything WotC did before 5e (and 5e is too new to fairly judge either way). And so yeah, it is NO surprise to me when I can have fun with every Pathfinder group I ever meet, and get inappropriately harassed by about a third of the MTG and D&D groups I encounter.

So yeah, this stuff matters. It has ALWAYS mattered. And we NEED it in order to allow EVERYONE to “all have fun.”

"

Dungeon Dames (via adventuresinozrpg)

(Source: werlicnessebaeddon, via feelknower1993)

3,948 notes

kingcheddarxvii:

Take any movie premise about a white man and make it about a grandma and it becomes twice as interesting

(via chocolateshoes)

30,763 notes